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Managed Print Services in Education

King’s College London is looking forward to savings of £1 million after implementing a Samsung managed print service for its 26,000 students and 6,113 staff.

We are impressed at how Samsung’s technology works together to provide an enhanced experience
We are impressed at how Samsung’s technology works together to provide an enhanced experience

The university already used PaperCut’s FindMe solution for pull printing and cross-charging, but it felt further efficiencies could be achieved by standardising on one model of print device and by implementing a proactive managed service with justin time delivery of consumables and support.

Samsung recommended its CLX9352NA colour A3 MFP, which has the speed and durability to support intensive use and high print volumes. Other factors in its favour are strong security features, good print quality, energy-saving eco modes and an open architecture solutions platform that enables all PaperCut features to be accessed from the touchscreen control panel.

The last factor is crucial, as one of the main drawbacks of King’s College London’s previous printers was the expensive add-on module needed to support PaperCut.

As well as eliminating this cost and reducing energy consumption, Samsung’s MPS has saved time and money spent on administration through centralised fleet management, with cross-charging to individual departments. Faculties themselves no longer have to deal with external print suppliers or stock consumables – efficiencies that Nick Leake, CIO of King’s College London, believes he will be able to build on in the future.

He said: “In Samsung we have found an innovative technology parter. We are considering Samsung displays for classrooms and lecture theatres and monitors for student computing rooms.

We are impressed at how Samsung’s technology works together to provide an enhanced experience, such as screen mirroring from tablets to displays to improve presentations and being able to print from the tablet with one touch. In the future we may also use wearable technology – to measure the body’s vital signs – to help our medical faculty conduct research.”

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2018